University of Chicago Medical Center improves the prognosis of lung cancer patients with multiple methods


alopah Date:2021-10-08 11:14:53 From:alopah.com
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The latest treatment for lung cancer is taking drugs to prevent the growth and spread of cancer cells. This treatment is called targeted therapy and is usually used in combination with chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Targeted therapies are promising because they produce fewer side effects than other traditional treatments such as chemotherapy.

 

Advanced treatment methods bring hope to patients

Although great progress has been made in the treatment of cancer in general, lung cancer is still one of the most deadly types of cancer in the world. According to the relevant data of China’s National Cancer Registration Center and the National Cancer Center, for many years, lung cancer has been the most diagnosed and the main type of cancer leading to death in China.

 

For patients, the diagnosis of lung cancer is undoubtedly a heavy blow. It is very necessary to understand the most advanced treatment methods at this stage to help them overcome the disease. University of Chicago Medical Center (UCM), as a world leading academic medical center, provides targeted and advanced treatment for lung cancer patients.

 

Customized therapy

The latest treatment for lung cancer is taking drugs to prevent the growth and spread of cancer cells. This treatment is called targeted therapy and is usually used in combination with chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Targeted therapies are promising because they produce fewer side effects than other traditional treatments such as chemotherapy.

 

The types of targeted therapies include small molecule enzyme inhibitors that inhibit tumor growth and monoclonal antibodies, angiogenesis inhibitors and gene therapy that inhibit cancer in different ways. According to the latest findings of researchers, cutting off the blood supply to tumors is also a way to treat cancer. Angiogenesis inhibitors are based on this discovery to treat different types of lung cancer.

 

Innovation of minimally invasive surgery

Video assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) is a good solution when patients have to undergo surgery. In the field of lung tumor surgery, surgeons usually use VATS to complete pneumonectomy, lobectomy or other kinds of surgery. This minimally invasive technique requires only three small incisions. During surgery, the surgeon can remove the cancerous part of the lung through an incision less than two inches long.

 

Targeted therapies

 

After VATS, the bleeding and pain of patients were reduced, the length of hospital stay was shortened, and they could return to normal life in just a few days, and the proportion of complications was less than 15%; In contrast, nearly 25% of patients with traditional open surgery have complications. Moreover, VATS surgery also greatly reduces the risk of death. Source: Journal of the American College of surgeons, 2012.

 

Because of these benefits compared with traditional surgery, about 70% of lung resection operations performed by surgeons at the University of Chicago Medical Center use minimally invasive technology. This is a remarkable achievement, higher than the national average of 40%.

 

With the rapid progress of robotic surgery technology, thoracic surgeons at the University of Chicago Medical Center can now perform robot assisted pneumonectomy and other thoracic surgery. This method uses computer-aided technology and robot technology to provide surgeons with a wider range of movement limit, high-definition 3D stereoscopic view and high-precision when performing intrathoracic surgery. Like vats, robotic surgery requires only a few small incisions.

 

In a recent study published by annals of thoracic surgery, researchers compared the prognosis of more than 33000 cancer patients. The results showed that the mortality, hospital stay and complications after robotic surgery were much lower than those of traditional open lobectomy.

 

In addition, the study also shows that if the operation is performed by thoracic surgeons (not general surgeons or cardiac surgeons) certified by the American Thoracic Surgery Committee (ABTS), the effect of lung cancer surgery is faster and the possibility of cure is higher. Many thoracic surgeons at the University of Chicago Medical Center specialize in lung surgery.

 

Police officer Greg klawitter is a cancer convalescent. He was diagnosed with non-small cell lung cancer and was in the third stage of clinical practice. His lung tumor was invading the rib at that time, and the prognosis was very poor, with a survival rate of only 25%.

 

From the initial stage of treatment, klawitter asked Mark Ferguson, a thoracic surgeon at the University of Chicago Medical Center, to be as Frank as possible without deliberately “whitewashing” his condition. Dr. Ferguson respects klawitter’s opinion and, like other patients, provides him with the most targeted treatment as clearly as possible. “I show the scan results to patients so that they can more intuitively understand the condition and cooperate with the treatment,” he said. “Most patients prefer this kind of frank communication.”

 

In a three hour operation, Dr. Ferguson removed about a third of the patient’s lung eroded by the tumor and four ribs. Then, the doctor used Gore tex ® The chest wall was reconstructed by mesh.

 

After the operation, klawitter recovered and returned to full-time police posts for nearly a decade. Now he has begun to enjoy retirement. In his spare time, he would ride a bike, play golf and share the happiness of family with his family.

 

The University of Chicago Medical Center has long been at the forefront of comprehensive lung cancer treatment. Since 1973, interdisciplinary medical teams have had the habit of holding weekly meetings for discussion. At present, the progress of detection, imaging, surgical technology, chemotherapy, radiotherapy and targeted therapy in the University of Chicago Medical Center provides more treatment options for patients and brings more hope for the cure of cancer.

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